Life in a Revolutionary War Encampment



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In addition to battles, we portray everyday camp life in the 18th century. During the period it was not uncommon for soldiers wives and families to follow the army. They were known as camp followers or distaff. Single woman were not generally allowed in camp. While the armies in one sense frowned upon it, they learned to grudgingly accept the positive aspects of the practice. It decreased the desertion rates and the wives took in washing, did the mending, and a host of other mundane tasks that helped the army and the soldiers get along during the long periods between battles and marches.  Indeed the majority of the soldier's life was spent in camp, drilling,     foraging for supplies and guard duty. Women as a rule drew half rations and children, quarter rations. It was a hard life but the family stayed together and made the army a more effective, cohesive fighting unit


                                                





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